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are you able to do so well in europe compared to america? is that just an example of you weren't disciplined in europe and you got a lot of business? i'm trying to understand. europe is harder right now than america. >> exactly. that underscores the point that what we do nobody else can do. we want to make the offer when your wallet is out of your pocket not six months after you leave the store. you can go look in the filing cabinet that oracle or s.a.p. or microsoft has and that's the 20th century. we're all about doing things in realtime. we make you that offer when your wallet is out and your credit card is in your hand. nobody else can do that. that's a universal big data realtime problem that only tibco can solve. >> you mentioned oracle and s.a.p. and analysts that i checked in with say that ibm has come on very strong. >> ibm is our strongest competitor. we beat them every single time in terms of technical performance. they do have strong relationships and at the end of the day we have to be three years ahead of the competition and we believe we are. >> okay. you had 25
't talk enough about it. and i've got to tell you, that's got to change in 2013. then there's europe. today, just today, i am wearing a tie that commemorates a brilliant strategy. one which works so amazingly that i'm still dazzled by it. what's happening on this tie? it's a man, a man in a suit kicking a can down the road. you see while the europeans were kicking the can, they gave themselves times to develop a plan to allow governments and banks to raise capital and fix the respective balance sheets at lower levels than anyone thought possible. coming into the year, you know what my number one worry was? we believe that every time italy and spain would have to raise money, do those deals, interest rates would shoot through the roof, bankrupting all involved, sovereign countries, companies, banks. instead, by letting cooler heads prevail through can kicking, smart private sector investors kicked the tires, not the cans, and they bought the debt. hit home runs every time they did. as rates came down hard, courtesy of bank backstop that did work. the europeans realized if they stopped
for weapon and mean. when he saw the pentagon estimate that the red army could overrun europe in two weeks, he wrote in the margin, i doubt. it took us three months just to take this on. when the spending request came in, ike would say i know those boys down at the pentagon. ike believed the real national security came from a sound economy. he was a deficit hawk. he controlled government spending and package. his famous speech warning against military-industrial complex came at the end of his presidency but, in fact, he been working on it all a long. mostly behind the scenes. heaven help us, he liked to say, that we'll get a president who knows less about the military than i do. this approach to the military was not just about the economy. in the berlin crisis in 58-59 and in early crisis with korea and vietnam in 1953, 54, the almost straight, the suez crisis in 1956, eisenhower was playing a bigger game for higher stakes. a west point cadet and a young army officer, ike had been a great poker player. indeed, he was so good that he had to give it up. he was taking too much money from his
at what's been happening in europe, you'll see a similar story there. actually a little stronger gains. in france, the cac up by about two-thirds of 1%. in germany, the dax up by 0.4% and ftse in london is up by a quarter percent. in asia overnight, you did see the hang seng down by about 1.2%. shanghai composite down, as well, down by 1%. in consider rea, the kospi up by 0.6%. oil prices have been a little weaker. down by about seven crept cents. and ten year note yielding 1.61%. that's been stuck in a tight range for quite a while. take a look at the dollar this morning. you'll see the euro at this point is still above 1.30, 1.3029 even though the dollar down across the board. dollar-yen at 82.10. gold prices this morning are up by about $8. as the fiscal cliff approaches, we're wondering what we can expect from the markets. our guest hosts again barry knapp and richard bernstein. barry, you're concerned about the direction the talks have taken. >> yeah, it's interesting as i actually traveled through europe last week, there is all this focus on the timing of getting a deal. but ther
's talk about europe. you mentioned emerging markets, but have you a big exposure to europe. stock markets going up, but no economic activity to speak of. is that where the economic activity not picking up yet for you guys either? >> yeah, when you look at last season, the last lawn and garden season, it was down somewhere in the neighborhood of about 15% of the the market overall, and that was really reflective, obviously of decreased consumer spending and people feeling a lot of the impacts of macroeconomic conditions in europe. as we look forward, into europe, into this next season, we're calling it flat, simply because there are is so much uncertainty going on over there with how they solve their economic problems. at the same time, geographic diversification is really important for us, especially in the emerging markets. last week, friday, we closed on a deal down in brazil, one of the key markets we look at from an emerging market standpoint, a company by the name of bronco, which does a lot of high-end equipment, commercial type equipment for the brazilian market and we think that w
they are developing. in southern europe, northern europe or different forms, in northern europe, the government believes in a strong social safety nets, believe in paying for health care, believe in playing a role in determining what businesses succeed or fail and yet those governments have budgets that are balanced and growing faster than we are and creating more jobs than we are. we have to be a little bit careful when we as we sometimes do in the united states that are high horse and say we understand capitalism, actually what is going on in the world is a competition between different versions and if our version produces more in the quality and less growth is seen as less fair, and others are seen as more fair and are producing more growth, who do you think is going to win that argument? >> host: a lot of people would say the northern european countries are socialist. is socialism a term that is outdated? >> guest: i think it is. let's take an example that is big in the election campaign. car companies going bankrupt during the last cycle, america is the big capitalist country didn't have a
of uncertainty. so you have china engineering a soft landing and starting to recover. you have europe away from the brink. greece got upgraded today. who would have thought it. that is what the market is looking at. saying okay. it is not going to be the worst kcase sharcenario, but you coul extend the middle class tax cuts and be done with it. it is in a recession. >> and i think the market would not like that very much. everybody is expecting that you get the middle class tax cuts done. >> and if you can get china and europe doing better. it is hard to be terribly bearish on the u.s. >> y are going to stay with our politico expert. this is a rally that has surprised experts. it hasn't been that easy to be optimistic. >> it is. i think you have to be cautious here. the probability that this could fall apart is very, very real. >> so, you have to be careful up at these levels as a trader. i have low exposure up here. i have protection. that is how you have to play this market. stay with us please. >> yesterday it looked like washington was inching towards a deal. but today, plan b could be sign
prefer to expand in asia than here, or even europe that i talk to. the banner to be found in america, natural gas and all that stuff, i can think of just three companies taking advantage of it. and that's talking about exporting it. the partnership sign. a 20-year agreement with total today, cqp is the symbol there. the real problem is in the exporting of the cheaper, cleaner fuel that is natural gas. not burning it here. or manufacturing with it. the industrial renaissance as i've been telling you, as much as it just breaks my heart, is stillborn. it's not getting better. retail's a real worry. i think we've fallen off a gift cliff. so few companies i know are doing well this holiday season. it is looking like a total bust. courtesy of sandy, incredibly warm weather and, of course, the fear engendered by the serious issue that is the fiscal cliff. i see that weakness and i'm not crazy about these stocks, in general. but i think that the conclusion of the housing crisis is upon us. which means there will be more money going to building and fixing up homes in 2013 than there was in 20
kinds of europe stuff. all anybody wants is fiscal cliff resolution. >> did the fed spook anybody yesterday? >> no, i don't think so. i really think what sold off yesterday is people were just concerned about the fiscal cliff again. the fed didn't really do anything. they put kindleing on the fire, if we get a fiscal cliff, there's an awful lot of money out there to get this market going. >> it just strikes me that a central bank now $85 billion new dollars per month into the financial system and buying treasuries to hold rates down, they're not going to let rates go up any. i just intuit that. >> no. there was some talk that perhaps what they signaled was higher rates sooner than 2015 and i think that's absolutely wrong. there's no way. this was an easing policy. they're putting more money into the system. they're not going to let rates go up any sooner than they need to. after most recession, they don't really raise rates until 18 months after. so i think 2017 is probably your number. >> 2017. all right. let me just ask you about some other stuff. japan rising. europe stocks doi
means i.c.e. will be clearing its equity trades in europe. this deal will not face regulatory scrutiny with the way that this is formed. the former deal attempts with deutsche boerse fell and here there was no overlap between i.c.e. and nyc. however, this clearing agreement makes it very tough and expensive to break up this deal between nyc and i.c.e., so the question market sources are asking now is what is the next move for cme group, nasdaq, hong kong exchange, among others? let's talk about when,deal and what it all means right now. scott, this is part of the deal that's really being underreported and not spoken about too much. that's the clearing exchange partnership. that's going to make it very tough to penetrate and to get any competitors to break up this deal. >> officials all over the globe who are assessing this deal and trying to figure out what they are going to do next to try to remain competitive. joining us now are david faber, bob pisani and steven guilfoyle and rick santelli at the cme. first, david, who broke the story this morning, i guess this deal had to happen ba
. >> all aboard. >> think about how often have we been clobbered by the mess in europe. every time things start to look less horrible across the atlantic, every time we begin to wonder it may be, just maybe, the worse is finally past, there's some hideous headline out of greece that the comes back with a vengeance and the s&p gets bashed down by a torrent of selling. that's why it's so important to prepare yourself and your stocks for the next catastrophe around the corner. expected or unexpected so that you can make money in any market, or at least lose less and not just when things are going smoothly. you have to build this stuff into what i call your world view. you have to assume that somewhere sometime something will go wrong. i'm not saying you should be a super skeptic permabear, not at all. over the course of my 31-plus years in this business i've seen the averages climb way too way, watch the market make people way too much money to ever be too cynical and close-minded. being negative all the type has not historically been a lucrative strategy, and i don't see any reason why that
, the meeting at the white house, 3:00 between the president and some congressional leaders. as for europe, getting some data out of japan overnight and some data out of europe. currently red arrows across the board, in london, paris, and frankfort. our road map begins at the white house. congressional leaders set to meet with the president, 3:00 p.m. this afternoon. senator reid has already said hopes of a deal are fading quickly. just two trading days left until the cliff. and it's not just the fiscal cliff. wind farms and dairy are set to get hit. >> the ports of the east coast and gulf coast are bracing for a potential strike. the potential for this, midnight sunday with a shutdown threatening to threaten 20% of the cargo traffic. >> and instagram feeling the sting of the flap around privacy with users, fleeing the site. how will this impact facebook? >> as we mentioned, dennis berman, "wall street journal" market place editor is joining us here on set once again for the next hour. good to have you back, dennis. lots to talk about between the cliff and other news. >> three days before
not too concerned. futures up 21 points. decent data out of europe, we will talk about in a minute what a day for the asian markets again. also coming up. our road map begins at andrews air force base where the president arrives in a couple of hours, cutting his hawaiian vacation short to address the fiscal cliff s there really any hope in the last attempt? does the market fade if there's no news tomorrow night? >> the nikkei continues its 21-month run. how much is the boj willing to put up with? >> looking a at potential strike in the nation's port on the east and southern coast, the first since '77 that could cost retailers and importers billions. businesses now asking its white house to get involved. >>> you can now get the nokia lumia for free, depending on the service provider contract you sign s that standard practice or a sign the company's flagship phone suspect selling well? >>> we will start off with news about the fiscal cliff. congress returning to capitol hill today to try to get a deal done on the cliff before the deadline on december 31st. senate majority leader harry rei
, but from europe, from the central bank there, as well as from china, don't forget, so we've had this liquidity which has taken asset prices with the stock market and the bond markets, pricing it way up, it is actually helping housing after a long wait. moving into the future, there will be some duction in relythe fear that people have. it is not only a lack of confidence, but it is a fear of things going wrong. as we get day to day, i think the fed has been the only place in town to inject some optimism or feeling somewhat better in the general public, as well as in business. until we get through this silliness in washington, i think people will continue to be cautious. >> susie: speaking of that caution and fear, what should investors be doing with their money. so many of them, not only individual investors, but professional investors are sitting on a pile of crash. ldof o invest? what is your investment strategy? >> people, the viewers right now, many of them have been out of the stock market for an extended period of time, because of all of the craziness of the last decade. i
right after the open. as for the action in europe, taking its cues from the united states. we'll see a big rally in china extending one of its biggest rallies in three years. we have a mixed bag in europe with italy up by about .2 of 1%. >> we'll do our best to keep focused on the business day. we'll be following the tragic shooting in connecticut, of course. the new york stock exchange will hold a moment of silence to honor the victims in the next few moments, and we'll be looking at the president's call for meaningful action and the politics of gun control. >> let's get to a road map for this morning. it starts with apple. under pressure once again. even dipping below $500 a share at some point this morning. shares will remain range bound near term. iphone 5 sales and cannibalization among the region. >> other concessions from the gop, the speaker proposing tax hikes for millionaires. could this be the tipping point. moving the talks beyond deadlock. >> a big week for earnings. yes, earnings. fedex, research in motion among the companies reporting. so finally maybe we'll be talking
fractionally. other news out of europe, debt tieback for from an day to receive additional buyback offers. those would be at deeply discounted prices and that would help lower the country's debt lead. >>> in asia, stocks touched a 16-month high and closed mostly higher on the session with good gains, as you can see, with the kospi up the most, 1.5 points. >> strong nebs out of china which suggest maybe the economy is rebounding more than expected. >> the exports. >> yeah. >> among the catalyst in asia trading today, economic stats out of china. export growths slowed sharply to 2.9% in december. that news j underscores the global headwinds dragging on the economy. but the chinese economy is showing solid signs of a pick up in domestic activity. industrial output was stronger than expected. the country has been saying for years it needs to shift a little bit from the export model the internal consumption. let their middle class grow and not be nearly as dependent on exports. and china's oil demand in november surpassed 10 million barrels per day for the first time ever. the country's crude
right now at where things stand in europe, you'll see that the ftse is barely higher. but you do see a bit of a decline for germany and france and modest moves across all of these markets. the bank of japan easing monetary policy again today, announcing an increase of its asset buying and lending program by more than $118 billion. that move was widely expected as part of the reason that you had seen the yen under quite a bit of pressure, yesterday, at least. you'll see right now that in japan, the market there actually closed down by just over 1%, 1.2% almost. the hang seng and the shanghai composite were slightly higher. oil prices this morning, you'll see right now, are down by about 4 cents to $89.94, so you have things to pick up in those prices over the last couple of days. and the ten-year note at this point which yesterday was yielding above 1.8%, dropping down to 77.2%. finally, take a look at the dollar and gold. yen is at 83.99. gold prices this morning with all these movements in the currency markets up by about $1.10. >>> winter storm draco is moving across the united sta
all closed in europe. only the uk, french, dutch and spanish stock markets are open and they're going to be closing early. there are now only five trading sessions left in 2012. get your act together. stocks and bonds, solid gains so far this year. the dow has advanced 8% in total. the s&p 500 up almost 14%. the nasdaq has jumped 16%. it's been a good year. the end of the year also means we are just days away from the fiscal cliff, however, and that's the bad news. and looming tax hikes, spending cuts, all of that. both sides warning a very big deal becoming a bit more unlikely. >> and my one bit of advice to speaker boehner is this. you cannot pass a bill with just republicans. on a broad thing like this, you need both. and he has put himself with plan b and sort of an impossible position. he has to get these hard right goes to go along with him. and he and the president were going to say we're going to pass a deal with the majority of republicans and the majority of democrats in the house and senate, we would get a mainstream deal. >> i think we're going to fall out of the fiscal tr
've been hearing our guests across europe telling us they are worried about the way we can see markets trade lower once people come back and realize we haven't had any agreement reached on the fiscal cliff. and that essential doesn't look likely at this point. >> okay, kelly. i couldn't help detect a little -- i mean, you're over there now. you're international. the most important story of 2013 is something with japan? >> yes, joe. >> though, no, no. it's here. >> yes, yes, nope. >> that's the third biggest thing. that's a little tail. that doesn't wag the big st. bernard that is the united states. >> here is one reason. japan isn't necessarily important because of the size of its economy. so if you're talking about global gpt growth, the u.s. is still the juggernaut there. >> fiscal abyss. fiscal abyss. >> japan is not only the leading gauge of what is happening across europe, but potentially what could happen in the u.s. if these policies aren't -- enough. it's will case of this extremely high debt load, something we're discussing in the u.s. and europe right now. if it manages to en
a smaller place. we supported the marshall plan that helped europe regain its strength. and pioneered the atm, so you can get cash when you want it. it's been our privilege to back ideas like these, and the leaders behind them. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping people and their ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ >>> so is president obama's labor relations board biased on behalf of big labor and their union bosses? that's the consensus of the new congressional report. joining us now is house oversight chairman, republican darrell issa of california. chairman issa, as always, welcome, sir. the headline story here is that the nlrb is bias in favor of unions and their bosses. that's not a shocking headline. but i just wanted to hear some of your key points. what's your most important point in your investigation? >> i think one of the most important discoveries was that there were inappropriate rule violations, what they call ex parte discussions that went on where you actually have the p
appreciate it. ? thank you. >> europe's fiscal woes dominated the american markets most of the year. >> the fragile european economy not out of the woods just yet. here is jimmy pathakukas of the institute. it was "barron's" just this week. this is the year to invest in europe. do you disagree with that or can the two work together? >> well, you know, they say the united states don't fight the fed. in europe you would say don't fight the ecb as long as they believe that they would do whatever it takes to keep the euro together, i guess that's a positive, but remember, you have an economy back in recession that was in terrible shape to begin with and i think you have a lot of austerity fatigue going on spain, italy, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how shoul
? >> separately. keith lives in the united states and i live in europe. >> one of the great clips i came across was you guys noodling together. >> yeah. >> how much of that is the secret sauce of the stones, where you two need to be together to do that? >> i think we've gone past that, really. >> we're made to do this. it's when we're not working there's a problem. or could be. but otherwise, mick and i have been working together the last few months. it's been a revelation really. >> really? >> yeah. how you can all get along once you're in the groove and stuff and how much we actually do fit together. it's very interesting. >> there was a time earlier this year, i thought -- i don't think it will happen again. i didn't mind. >> there was a time when it was in the balance when people were saying oh, it's not going to happen. it looked like it, but i never believed it. >> and as they had struggled for harmony, some in the band have also tackled addiction over the years, most notably keith's hard-won battles with heroin. >> i don't do anything no more. i've done it all. once you've done it all, w
against our people, who took to the streets to demand freedom. long live syria, free and europe. >> he also defected from the bashar al-assad government. before that he held several high-ranking posts including the ambassador to sweden. i asked him how significant it is. >> it is very significant because one of the highest- ranking officers that have affected so far, and this man is the head of the military police and he must know a lot of things that have been going on by the army, invading the cities and killing civilians and bombarding the area with chemical weapons. he has said homs was bombed with chemical weapons. this is his statement. i think he was in a position to do this because you have all the reports coming to him. >> is it really that significant given that bashar al-assad still can count the military in multiples of tens of thousands? he is getting help from the russians, the iranians, and also has fallen out of lebanon. he looks pretty secure and appears to be acting with impunity. >> you are right. we cannot forget the fact this person has a lot of information about t
all over europe. >> yeah, right. >> if she's looking for her next destination, where should she go in europe? >> by train. that's what you do. >> you can sleep on it it's your hotel room for the night. >> it is but by december 31st book this deal. you get a global pass on eurail and it gives you access to 23 separate countries. you can sleep through all of them. >> you don't have to sleep through the country, but on your way to the country. >> exactly. >> skip a night paying for the hotel. two hotel deals. >> first, hilton worldwide, 40% off on weekend stays, that's across all their brands, and the best deal of all is right here in new york you've heard of restaurant week we call the dead week. they are not calling it hotel week from january 4th to the 20th. 26 different hotels here in new york offering deals as low as $100 a night versus $500 and up from that period of time from january 4th to the 20th you cannot beat that. >> i want to travel. >> i love traveling, although thinking about the train, i was once on an overnight train in europe, it literally shu
people have to talk about the fact that essentially all these attacks in both the u.s. and europe are currently where guns are banned. >> we appreciate your perspective tonight. >> in the wake of friday's shooting in newtown, will the gun history face legal troubles like the tobacco companies did one time? mary thompson tackles that area. good evening, mary. >> good evening, joe. given the ongoing investigation into the rampage that killed 20 children and 6 adults, it's premature to say what legal action might be taken. when and if it is, it won't be an easy task. the 2005 protection of lawful commerce and arms acts pro secretaries manufacturerss are distributors and dealers from liability if others their probably. this makes it virtually impossible to seek damages from the gun history. another option is suing if the dealer was founding to negligent in selling the gun and if there are signs of negligence in the gunies design. you could argue that added safety features are needed. a feature like say an authorization technology in a would prevent someone from being used by someone o
and ongoing problems in europe. the market has done better than it has usual done. what's changed? i think there will be continued political turmoil and slow growth but that's, particularly given valuations, may not be a bad year for equities as all. >> i'm going to add to that list having been a good year for the stock market. also had a lot of recovery in the housing market as well. do all these good things, all this progress become undone if we go over the fiscal cliff. >> i think clearly we've seen some healing in housing which is great and as has already been said we've seen some good progress over in europe and in china so that's all great. i'm neutral on equities in my allocation strategy fund, target rich funds and the reason for that is the fiscal cliff. if we go over the fiscal cliff then i think that given how lean companies are, and as slow as we're growing, we could see the economy dip back into recession and earnings estimates will have to go lower. >> the mastercard report on retail sales not good. the worst since '08, and you're concerned -- obviously there are those who fe
the previous panel talk about state government, and one of the big problems in europe is that there is no fiscal coordination among the independent countries, and somewhat to our state, and who has to come along and bail them out when they have not done what they are supposed to do. i don't know that we're all that much different so we have a great panel. people that are far smarter than i am, and i'm going to introduce them all, and ask questions, and i'll ask the pam to keep answers relatively short so we can get through a lot of questions, and still get out of here on time. first of all, we have ali son frasier, director of thomas a. rowe institute for economic studies at the heritage foundation. director -- as director, she oversees the heritage foundation research on a wide range of domestic, economic issues incoming federal spending, taxes, the debt, and the deficit. before joining heritage in 2003, she was deputy director of the oklahoma office of state finance where she worked for governor frank keating. next on the panel, we have the institute fellow and the r
that he is in the running tells you quite a lot about the importance of europe this year. earlier today, we were talking about the fact that they had picked trichet on in the past. he doesn't necessarily regret it. he said oppose dollars to some of the other types of running, they look for someone who is having a positive impact. they did consider angela merkel. that's the answers with regard to the person of the year. let me give you a quick sense of what else has been happening in europe overnight. the big moves, we're coming out of asia. 4.3% of the shanghai composite. it just had its best day in three years. this follows some pmi data that supported the idea of domestic spending. of course, it's been this coiled spring market over the last couple of weeks. after we saw the shanghai fall below the 2,000 level, it's in several big days. the news agency tweeted a picture of chinese stockbrokers grinning this morning to give you a sense of the mood. compare that to the nikkei which was down this morning going into the election these weekend likely to put shinzo abe back in power. he's s
because many companies, high-tech companies from america, from europe, have subsidiaries in china, selling to chinese industries and trading companies. north korea works that system very well to end up with those kinds of high-tech items from outside china. and so while i can't speak specifically on the missile program i certainly can on the nuclear and yes, indeed, north korea buys european high-tech equipment and likely u.s. equipment. so it's a problem. china has been made aware of the problem but they haven't done enough and, i think this missile launch could be a further step. again if it happens, it could be another step in building pressure on china to enforce the u.n. security council sanctions on north korea and in fact to team up with the rest of the world to try to apply stronger sanctions and more effective sanctions on north korea. jon: kim jong-un and his father indicated, they proved time and time again they were more interested in having ballistic missiles and that kind of technology than they were in seeing their people fed. are you convinced that there is a way to impose
surpassed north maeshg and europe combined in terms of global power, based upon gdp, population size, military spending and technological spending. china alone will probably have the largest economy, surpassing that of the united states a few years before 2030. people because of technology, people really have more power than they've ever had before, individuals have more power an that can also cause problems with, you know, people using technology for ill means. >> is this the whole report? >> the 140-page rundown. i'm sure the president gets a bigger one. >> this is an intelligence report. >> yes. >> why on earth would anyone buy a jillion dollar card for starbucks. >> this is the question of the surgery. they had a $450 stainless steel elite card. now they're on ebay getting them for maybe $1,000. some is of the bids are up to $1,000. it's collectors item for the to be 1%. these starbucks limited edition gift cards have sparked a frenzy on ebay of people who want to hold on to this. >> it's the perfect gift for people who like to buy overpriced coffee already. >> you get perks, lik
of zara, one of the strongest retailers in europe, out with sales. you see that their shares are down. even though their nine-month sales figure was up 17% year on year, they said so far in the fourth quarter that figure was slowing to something in the range of 15%. so still a strong set of figures from inbitex. if you're concerned about the consumer, but not as strong as we have seen in the past. that's what's happening in spain. i want to draw your attention -- use guys were talking about unions. here's a union story that tells something about the rebalancing in the eurozone. potentially germany. we know with the xetera dax up .3%. and almost 30% this year. investors see if the euro project hangs together, it's going to mean renation in germany. that is some wage inflation, some price inflation. the public sector union verde, powerful union, along with some others with its contract up at the end of the year is asking, guys, for a 6.5% pay rise next year. it got about 2.5% for the last couple of years. it is on the public sector side but also an example of what kind of pay hikes we m
these days. >> and i want to take a look at a longer term chart. in the midst of all this in europe and everywhere else, that is a chart that a lot of people would be envious of. jim, we can't neglect what's happening today in washington. has it affected you at all? have you made any plans? are you doing anything based on what these publioliticians are wrangling' about? >> certainly, it's slowed our growth. >> it has? >> in the couple of years, it's slowed even faster. government was weaker than normal for the quarter and i think we'll see that going forward a bit. it's hurting for us. we have a lot of cash, we have no debt. so it's not a major, major impact. certainly the lack of clarity is hurting our customers and that ultimately affects us, as well. >> so you do business with the government and also the uncertainty around the policy has affected some of your customers to some extend? >> oh, absolutely. now, we sell a high valued proposition, so we do well in downed markets. so at the same time it's hurt us with some government customers. overall, the lack of certainty has led pe
of central europe. they have a map of the park benches and a fire hydrant. we did not have a map. do your best, he said. i looked up and my brother was an enlisted man in the army and he said, whatever you do as a second lieutenant, don't show indecision. just make in order and make a decision and move with it. so i grabbed my driver and radio operator in a looked out across one of president eisenhower's new interstates going alongside it and i saw phillips 66 gas station. there is the rest of the story. i grabbed him and went over and walked in full battle gear, gas mask, pistol and everything else up into this midnight on the midnight shift filling station operator. can i have a map of? you know, when the shows an edge of memphis appear? he jumped off of his stool, scattered around behind the counter and gave me a map and out the door i went. that was preparation number one. we did at least have the map and the lead jeep for 640 military policeman, 140 vehicles, the driver and elite jeep and the lieutenant have a map. crossing into the base, i notice that there was a shore patrolman wor
be causing a slow and steady demasculinizing of men. and in 2009, congress followed europe's lead and banned certain phthalates for use in children's toys. congress came under pressure to act because of a study by dr. shanna swan, an epidemiologist at the university of rochester medical school. dr. swan compared the levels of phthalates in a group of pregnant women with the health of the baby boys they gave birth to. did you find that the higher the level of phthalates in the mother's urine during pregnancy, the greater the problems in the young boys? >> yes. >> what did you find in the babies? >> we found that the baby boys were, in several subtle ways, less completely masculine. >> dr. howard snyder, a pediatric urologist at children's hospital in philadelphia, says swan's findings line up with what he's seeing in newborn baby boys-- an alarming increase in deformed sex organs. >> lie him down, and let me just examine him. >> dr. snyder operated on one-year-old griffin to correct something called hypospadias, a birth defect that causes problems in urination. but he's good now, right? >> he
. really appreciate it. >>> it's kind of a blue christmas across much of europe. we are talking about the government's cut back on spending. instead of helping, we'll tell you how it actually spread the recession there. are everything. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. hurry in for a droid incredible 4g lte by htc for $49.99. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. >> i'm saying to all of my family in trenton, njdz, i miss you all and love you all. if you missed, it's your fall. should have watched it. bye-bye. >> thank you for your service, car
is their client. >> reporter: so far, only a few dozen have been sold in stores in europe and the u.s. but the orders keep coming in. even though there is some skepticism on the street. >> i think it's kind of creepy, actually. i don't like that idea at all. it just sort of seems a bit like big brother. >> that's weird. sick. >> especially if i was shopping in the underwear section. >> reporter: one high-end retailer in manhattan says it won't use the i.c., worried it may be an invasion of privacy. >> with the mannequin, i think it's even more frightening. it's almost as though -- remember that old movie "fx," somebody is watching you. so it's concerning. >> reporter: and in this economy, the last thing stores want to do is scare people away. >> if you're doing things the comfortable might not be comfortable with, you might have crossed the line. >> reporter: maybe if the mannequins were a little more human. >> yeah, i think that's a great idea. that way if you need something, you can ask them where it is. >> reporter: of course, there are actual real people already hired to do that
're seeing a spike in vix futures. it's indicating more volatility ahead. europe, largely taking the cues from here in the united states, and the news last evening about plan b. we are seeing a 1% loss in italy, germany is down by .9%. >> of course, futures as you saw are taking a hit on concerns that a deal will not be reached to avert that fiscal cliff. an attempt by house speaker boehner to avoid that class and pass the so-called plan b tax bill. that failed. the measure that would have kept current tax rates for those making less than $1 million a year. it never even made it to the house floor. speaker boehner is scheduled to hold a news conference about an hour from now. of course, we'll bring that to you live. >> here we are. >> here we are once again. >> there was no real plan b. there was no real possibility of this. the republicans, the vast majority signed a pledge, they will not vote for tax increase. who would think they would suddenly turn around and vote for a tax increase. they pledged not to. >> the speaker said they might. >> i don't care. >> unless it's some sort of a pl
of the next 10, 15 and 20 years. some people look to europe and say austerity there is not working. and i agree. an austerity program that's too quick can only make our problems worse. but i also see parts of europe that said by kicking the can down the road they can ignore their problems. and the only thing worse than austerity is the bond markets forcing a crisis upon your economy, forcing a crisis that would make a divide between spending and revenues more unsustainable. if we wait 3 years, 5 years, 10 years, 12 years from now we will be unable to safely deal with these problems. that's why we need a balanced and responsible deal now. after the election, many of my colleagues, particularly those on the republican side, have sort of publicly acknowledged that we need new revenue, has to be part of the solution. i believe even some of the numbers the president put forward in terms of revenue goals are too modest in terms of of what is needed to be put back into the revenue stream not to grow the size of government but to simply pay our bills. it is critically important that this new reve
: the waft is sweeping europe and soon to be on our shores. at juniper kitchen restaurant in ontario, he creates a revolutionary eating experience. show us how it's done. >> since you said you like mint chocolate chips, we're going to do that. so just straight, raw ingredients. mint and cocoa mint, put these together, a little syrup. a little chocolate. we're going to strain all that out. let's see what happens. there's the straw. >> reporter: it's like an ice cream cloud. with endless flavor combinations, he can turn any meal into a culinary quiz show. let's see if you can trip me up. >> this one might stump you. >> cherry? >> no. >> reporter: raspberry. >> that's it. >> reporter: round two, here we go. >> classic cocktail. you almost got it. >> reporter: is this a mojito? >> yes, it is. >> reporter: and i'm cuban and it took me that long to get that one. >> our hold friend tonya rivero. i still got to chew. i don't know about you. >> i don't know if he makes a potato chip vapor. >> i'm still going for it, though. >> you can still inhale those. >> that's how charlie sheen eats. >>> this
headlines all over the world. conor powell begins with a financial crisis in europe. >> the eurozone continues with a huge financial hole. standard & poor's downgraded in nine countries in the union. financial ministers reaching an agreement on another greek bailout. a lot of trouble with debt ridden banks. europe demanding an end to stringent austerity measures that all this resulted in the eurozone going back into another recession. thirty-two people dead, including two americans off the coast of italy. when the cost of concorde a cruise ship runs aground >> more than 79 people killed and 8000 injured. a district court says that they would like to oust president hosni mubarak to life in prison. and mohammed morsi, of the muslim brotherhood party takes charge for it in november, he grants himself absolute power that brings thousands of protesters to the streets of cairo, egypt. three members of a russian all-female punk band stage a protest against vladimir putin are sent to jail for hooliganism. inciting worldwide protest and demand for the release. rupert murdoch launches into the
with nutrients. and considered fine dining. and always have been in europe. >> always have been in europe. but the u.s. has been squeamish about those types of meat. >> not anymore. >> not anymore. >> but today, you have two dishes to start any meal. let's get started. the first one, is something with pomegranate. >> i want to start with chicories. they're bitter greens. most people have a beef or ham, a turkey. you want to have something that's going to be a little bitter that will cut that richness. so, we try to work with, you know, a little bit of bitter greens. this is your standard treviso. i'm going to cut that nice. really festive colors. really beautiful. >> and this is kosto franco. >> it likes -- >> i'm going to take out that core. watch out. i don't like to cut this green. i like to tear it. >> and you also have pomegranates. are these pistachios? >> these are pistachios. you have all these vibrant colors here. really simple. and now, pistachios are going to add a nut meat, fat protein to it. >> how do you get them out of the pomegranate? >> that is so hard. >> would you mind
? >> quite simply, europe looks so bad where would you put the money? alternative to --. lori: talking about that for a year now. there is no interest payment in u.s. bond. u.s. stocks are really a better return right now. >> well they are right now but if we go over the cliff you might not want to repeat that statement. cash might, a lot of people are going to have to move to cash if they really feel shaky about the u.s. government. but gold. we might see a boom in gold. lori: buy up that bullion. bury it in the backyard. real hard asset. >> just like french farmers. lori: no kidding. tracy: peter, you're great. have a happy new year. >> happy new year, friend. lori: i wasn't arguing with him. i was agreeing with him. tracy: you're question is a good one. where are the bond vigilantees? they have been gone for months now. lori: for years. tracy: for years, you're right, my goodness another housing bailout, the government backing up a plan to bail out underwater homeowners that may ultimately leave you on the hook. tracy: let's look how oil is trading as we head out to break. it is up almost
is that coming from because i see china coming back a little, maybe europe's done going down, we seem to be a little bit stalled. somebody's building something around this world. >> i think it's a matter of jabil being very competitive in the markets we serve and having sufficient diversification so that if one part of our business, for instance networking on telecommunications may be going through a lull or slower period with government spending and bess spending, capital spending down, we have some other parts of our business that are doing extremely well. you mentioned some of the mechanics business we're involved in which we call our consumer technology business. that has nothing to do with electronics so we don't have to sell any electronic hardware for those businesses to perform well. parts of our business are a reflection of the economy and other parts of our business are growing very robustly. so i'm very hopeful for the balance of the year and, you know, i think the company is diversified enough to take advantage of whatever opportunities are out there. >> okay. i am so glad
, europe, the european union was fractured by debt and the plans to fix it. that saga is far from over. >>> number three, the housing market, finally, finally bottomed out. the combination of home prices and continued mortgage rates set off a building and buying spree. well-he well-heeled investors began to buy entire neighborhoods. and homeowners got more with a hefty down payment. >> and cnn predicts that barack obama will be reelected president of the united states. >> the election, more than just about obama and romney, more about socialism, and capitalism and spending, about the role government should have in your life. >> number one is the fiscal cliff. lawmakers saw it coming, but didn't bother to pay any attention to it until after the election. had they put politics aside and dealt with it earlier, who knows how strong the u.s. economy would be right now. >> up next, children in need of a home are caught in the middle of a dispute over human rights. and we'll meet one man reaching into his own pocket to help america ease its enormous debt. [ male announcer ] rocky had no idea
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